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Soft Buckwheat Bread Recipe (GF, DF)

A healthy recipe for buckwheat bread made with buckwheat flour and a mix of other gluten free flours. To make this buckwheat flour bread soft and pliable you’ll need yeast, egg and natural plant based thickeners. There is no kneading involved and the hydrated dough offer large air pockets in the crumb. Enjoy your buckwheat bread in a sandwich, toasted or save for later by freezing.

Buckwheat Bread Recipe

This buckwheat bread recipe is simple and customizable, the ingredients come together quickly in just one bowl. It requires about 25 minutes or less of “hands-on dough” the rest of the time is “hands off” time, in that the dough will be resting, raising and baking.

Just like my pumpernickel bread with buckwheat flour, this recipe for buckwheat bread uses a combination of gluten free flours, the difference is that is doesn’t need a sourdough starter. But if you’re fine with gluten, just use all purpose flour along with buckwheat flour. See more info below.

Sliced buckwheat bread with seeds.
Sliced buckwheat bread.

If you’re interested in making a buckwheat sourdough bread, you can use this gluten free sourdough starter recipe as a guide for making your own sourdough. You just need to replace the rice flour with buckwheat flour, and the rest of the process is basically the same.

I use sourdough in many gluten free bread recipes where I’m not using yeast, eggs or gums, like this white gluten free sandwich bread, this banana bread or these gluten free buns. And I even have a gluten free baguette recipe in my GF DF Cookbook.

Even though baking bread with buckwheat flour is not a common thing, I think buckwheat is actually quite appealing in all kinds of baked goods. The buckwheat crackers recipe which I posted a while ago proved to be one of reader’s favorite.

Slices of soft pliable buckwheat flour bread topped with sunflower seeds and sesame seeds.
Slices of soft pliable buckwheat flour bread topped with sunflower seeds and sesame seeds.

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Buckwheat Bread Ingredients

For making this recipe for buckwheat bread you need the following:

  • Buckwheat flour – buckwheat flour can be particularly tricky, it’s structure in baking breads can vary according to it’s quality. A finer and lighter flour will yield a fluffier buckwheat bread.
  • Flour (wheat or gluten free) – replacing all of the flour in a recipe with (gluten-free) buckwheat four is not going to work, the bread will not rise and will be hard and dry. That’s why I’m going to use a good proportion of other gluten free flours besides buckwheat flour. I’ll be using my gluten free flour mix, but you can use your favorite if you wish, including regular all-purpose flour (see notes below for that).
  • Psyllium husk – is the crucial ingredient in gluten free bread baking. It acts as a binder, and it gives this buckwheat bread elasticity and pliability. Using the husk gives a better result than powder, so make sure to use that.
  • Flax seeds – ground into flour like consistency. They will help with texture and reduce the gumminess.
  • Fat – oil or melted butter will work, it has the role of softening the bread texture.
  • Egg – the egg will help with the texture and structure. Beating the egg also helps with getting a softer fluffier texture.
  • Sweetener – maple sugar or honey are great, but it’s totally up to you. I’m using this for activating the yeast.
  • Acid – lemon juice or apple cider vinegar will work. This will help with the taste, and provide a little tang.
  • Yeast – dry yeast is necessary for this type of gluten free buckwheat bread if you want a fluffy sponge like texture. I also tried the same recipe without yeast, only using baking powder or in combination with baking soda, it was a total fail. The bread didn’t rise much and had a very gummy texture. The taste was also not impressive.
  • Water (warm, ideally at 105F degrees).
  • Salt – will enhance the flavor.

Find the complete printable recipe with measurements below.

How To Make The Buckwheat Bread

First we’re going prepare the flour. In case you need to make the gluten free flour mix yourself, make sure you have it ready before starting. Also finely grind the flax seeds with a coffee grinder.

Step 1. Activate the yeast:

  • In a 1/4 cup of warm water dissolve a 1/4 oz yeast packet (I used red star) and 1 teaspoon of sugar. I used maple sugar instead of white sugar.
  • Let it activate (puff up) while you prepare the rest.
Yeast activation with warm water and a teaspoon of sugar.
Yeast activation with warm water and a teaspoon of sugar.

Step 2. Soak the psyllium husk and flax seeds in liquid:

  • To start you need the psyllium husk and ground flax seeds to expand so they could provide the necessary binding properties.
  • So, in the warm water (1 ¼ cup) add the psyllium and the ground flax seeds. Mix until homogenous. The mixture will transform into a loose gel very quickly.
  • To that add the rest of liquid ingredients (the oil or melted butter, the apple cider vinegar, honey and the beaten egg), mix to combine. Set aside.
Process shots showing how to combine all wet ingredients with psyllium husk and ground flax seeds to get a gel like consistency for the dough.
Combining all wet ingredients with psyllium husk and ground flax seeds. You will get a gel like consistency.

Step 3. Combine all the dry ingredients and mix everything together:

  • Then add the flours and salt, gently mix until barely incorporated.
  • Finely add the yeast and mix until well combined. You can use a silicon spatula for mixing. The dough should look slightly sticky and soft.
Process shots showing how to add the dry ingredients and the activated yeast, and mixing everything to form the dough for buckwheat bread.
Add the dry ingredients and the activated yeast, mix to form the dough.

Step 4. Bake the buckwheat bread:

  • Transfer the dough into a loaf pan. I used a non-stick 8 x 5 inch bread loaf tin with 4 Inch high walls and a 6.5 cup capacity from Jamie Oliver. If yours is not non-stick then line it with parchment paper.
  • Smooth the top with your spatula and gently press to round the corners and sides.
  • Sprinkle the surface of the loaf with seeds or crushed nuts if you like.
  • Cover with plastic wrap or a towel and let it rise for 50 minutes or up to an hour.
  • Bake the buckwheat bread at 350F for 50 minutes.
  • Let the loaf cool for at least 10 minutes in the pan, before removing and cooling fully on a wire rack. 
  • Let it cool completely before slicing with a serrated bread knife.
Process shots showing how to work with the dough and bake the gluten free buckwheat flour bread.
Transfer the wet sticky dough to a baking tin, sprinkle with seeds, let it rise and bake.

Related: Soft Gluten Free Wraps / Tortillas (Vegan)

How Does This Buckwheat Bread Taste?

The texture is moderately dense and flexible with a distinct golden brown crust. Toasting the bread results in a crisp, crunchy, filling slice. The taste of the bread is mild and similar to a whole wheat bread, because we combined multiple types of flours.

Baked gluten free buckwheat bread cooling on a wooden board.
Baked gluten free buckwheat bread.

Buckwheat FAQs

How does buckwheat flour affect bread?

When mixing buckwheat flour in bread it tends to yield a heavier texture, a darker toasted color and a more earthy taste.


Why does buckwheat take more time to rise than regular flours?

Since buckwheat flour doesn’t have gluten and has a heavier texture it need help and more time to rise (or bake). The solution is to combine with other flours and add a raising agent.

Why is buckwheat flour dark?

Buckwheat flour can be found in two forms: dark (made from unhulled buckwheat groats) or light (made from hulled buckwheat). The darker buckwheat flour has more fiber and flavor, while the lighter one has a finer texture and a lighter color.

Can celiac eat buckwheat flour?

Yes, buckwheat flour is naturally gluten free.

Is buckwheat bread good for you?

The buckwheat is mainly composed of carbs and have a well-balanced amino acid profile, a good amount of fiber, resistant starch, minerals, antioxidants and high-quality protein. And due to having a low to medium glycemic index, it’s considered safe to eat for most people with diabetes. But you should take into account the other ingredients used in a buckwheat bread before categorizing it as healthy. Added starches, gums and processed ingredients makes the bread less healthy.

Toasted buckwheat buckwheat bread slices smeared with butter.
Toasted buckwheat buckwheat bread is absolutely delicious, crunchy crust while soft and flexible inside.

Recipe Variations & Substitutions

  • Make vegan buckwheat bread: if you omit the egg. But it might yield a more gummy texture.
  • Other gluten free flours that might work along with buckwheat: a combination of sorghum flour and oat flour or a combination of arrowroot flour and teff flour (the color is darker than buckwheat).
  • Not Gluten Free? Use all purpose white flour: use it along with buckwheat flour as a substitute for the gluten free flour mix. As a result you can omit the psyllium husk and use less water.
  • Add seeds or nuts in the dough: sunflower seeds, pumpkin seed, some buckwheat groats or ground almonds will also work.
  • No yeast? Unfortunately, you need it. This type of bread doesn’t produce good results with baking powder and baking soda alone. I tried it!
  • Add dried fruit in the dough: raisins, chopped prunes or cranberries.
  • Ways to enjoy: dunked into vegetables soups or as healthy toast snacks.
Sliced buckwheat flour bread.
Sliced buckwheat flour bread.

Storing Tips

  • Storing leftovers: Store the buckwheat bread at room temperature for up to 5-6 days, in an airtight bag or container. I like to pre-slice after baking.
  • Freezing: let the buckwheat loaf cool completely and then slice it. Place the slices in a sealed plastic bag and freeze for up to 3 months.
  • Thawing: Place the frozen slices in a toaster and enjoy warm soft fresh buckwheat bread just like the fresh one.
Buckwheat bread stored in a plastic bag ready for the freezer.
For longer storage place the buckwheat bread in a plastic bag and freeze it.

More Bread Recipes

More Recipes With Buckwheat or Buckwheat Flour

If you made this buckwheat flour bread recipe, then please leave a star rating or a comment below the recipe card.

Your feedback is really helpful for me and readers!
buckwheat bread recipe
Print Recipe

Soft Buckwheat Bread Recipe (GF/DF)

A healthy recipe for buckwheat bread made with buckwheat flour and a mix of other gluten free flours. To make this buckwheat flour bread soft and pliable you’ll need yeast, egg and natural plant based thickeners. There is no kneading involved and the hydrated dough offer large air pockets in the crumb. Enjoy your buckwheat bread in a sandwich, toasted or save for later by freezing.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time50 mins
Resting Time1 hr
Total Time2 hrs 10 mins
Course: miscellaneous
Cuisine: Clean Eating, Dairy Free, Gluten Free
Servings: 15 slices
Calories: 148kcal
Author: HealthyTasteOfLife
Pin Recipe Save

Ingredients
 

For Yeast Activation

  • ¼ cup water - warm
  • ¼ oz yeast - 1 packet
  • 1 tsp sugar - I used maple sugar

Wet Ingredients and Thickeners

  • cup water - warm
  • 3 tbsp psyllium husk - not powder
  • 3 tbsp flax seeds - ground
  • 1 large egg - beaten (omit if vegan)
  • 3 tbsp fat - neutral oil, melted ghee or butter
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar - or lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp honey - or maple syrup

Dry Ingredients

Instructions
 

Step 1. Activate the yeast:

  • In a 1/4 cup of warm water dissolve a 1/4 oz yeast packet (I used red star) and 1 teaspoon of sugar. I used maple sugar instead of white sugar.
  • Let it activate (puff up) while you prepare the rest.

Step 2. Soak the psyllium husk and flax seeds in liquid:

  • To start you need the psyllium husk and ground flax seeds to expand so they could provide the necessary binding properties.
  • So, in the warm water (1 ¼ cup) add the psyllium and the ground flax seeds. Mix until homogenous. The mixture will transform into a loose gel very quickly.
  • To that add the rest of liquid ingredients (the oil or melted butter, the apple cider vinegar, honey and the beaten egg), mix to combine. Set aside.

Step 3. Combine all the dry ingredients and mix everything together:

  • Then add the flours and salt, gently mix until barely incorporated.
  • Finely add the activated yeast mixture and mix until well combined. You can use a silicon spatula for mixing.
    The dough should look slightly sticky and soft.

Step 4. Bake the buckwheat bread:

  • Transfer the dough into a loaf pan. I used a non-stick 8 x 5 inch bread loaf tin with 4 Inch high walls and a 6.5 cup capacity. If yours is not non-stick then line it with parchment paper.
  • Smooth the top with your spatula and gently press to round the corners and sides.
  • Sprinkle the surface of the loaf with seeds or crushed nuts if you like.
  • Cover with plastic wrap or a towel and let it rise for up to an hour.
  • Bake the buckwheat bread at 350F for 50 minutes.
  • Let the loaf cool for at least 10 minutes in the pan, before removing and cooling fully on a wire rack. 
  • Let it cool completely before slicing with a serrated bread knife.

Notes

Buckwheat Bread Variations and Substitutions

  • Make vegan buckwheat bread: if you omit the egg. But it might yield a more gummy texture. You might also need to adjust the amount of dry ingredients a bit.
  • Other gluten free flours that might work along with buckwheat: a combination of sorghum flour and oat flour or a combination of arrowroot flour and teff flour (the color is darker than buckwheat).
  • Not Gluten Free? Use all purpose white flour: use it along with buckwheat flour as a substitute for the gluten free flour mix. As a result you can omit the psyllium husk and use less water.
  • Add seeds or nuts in the dough: sunflower seeds, pumpkin seed, some buckwheat groats or ground almonds will also work.
  • No yeast? Unfortunately, you need it. This type of bread doesn’t produce good results with baking powder and baking soda alone. I tried it!
  • Add dried fruit in the dough: raisins, chopped prunes or cranberries.
Tried this recipe?Mention @HealthyTasteOfLife or tag #healthytasteoflife!

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 148kcal | Carbohydrates: 22.1g | Protein: 3.82g | Fat: 5.5g | Fiber: 1.84g | Sugar: 1.26g | Calcium: 47.86mg | Iron: 1.23mg

The information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator.

A healthy recipe for buckwheat bread made with buckwheat flour and a mix of other gluten free flours. To make this buckwheat flour bread soft and pliable you’ll need yeast, egg and natural plant based thickeners. There is no kneading involved and the hydrated dough offer large air pockets in the crumb. Enjoy your buckwheat bread in a sandwich, toasted or save for later by freezing. #buckwheatbread #glutenfreebread #buckwheatflour #buckwheatflourbread #glutenfreebreadrecipe

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Recipe Rating




Jodie

Tuesday 24th of January 2023

Hi Olga .. making this bread atm and noticed my mix of psyllium and flax goes way thick .. my dough was too hard to blend .. just confirming it was tablespoons and not teaspoons of psyllium and ground flax seeds and wondering what size tablespoon do you use ( 15ml or 20 ml ) could that make a difference as I use ( aus ) 20 ml size . Otherwise I’m following your recipe exactly . thank you Regards Jodie 💕

HealthyTasteOfLife

Wednesday 25th of January 2023

I'm using a standard US tablespoon, which is approximately 14.8 ml (0.50 US fl oz), a United Kingdom and Canadian tablespoon is exactly 15 ml (0.51 US fl oz), and an Australian tablespoon is 20 ml (0.68 US fl oz). I hope this helps.

Chrissie

Monday 23rd of January 2023

Hi... Would a mixture of arrowroot, oat flour and brown rice flour work as the gf flour blend? I've used Teff and Sorghum in the past and find them very heavy and I don't really like the taste of them. I'm good to go with all the other ingredients, so can't wait to try it. Thanks for any input.

Chrissie

HealthyTasteOfLife

Wednesday 25th of January 2023

It looks like this combination would work, now it depends in what proportions.

Heidi

Monday 24th of October 2022

I have made this bread 3x now and I love the flavor and texture, but cannot seem to get it to rise nearly as much as your pictures. I ground my own hulled buckwheat and used your gf flour mix, except I did not have arrowroot so used tapioca flour.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. Before I had to go GF I was an avid baker, I used sourdough amd made all kinds of breads. I am always frustrated with gf bread as I cannot get them to rise much. I like making my own gf flour mixes, not bought ones.

Thank you,

Heidi Hicks

HealthyTasteOfLife

Friday 28th of October 2022

I'm glad your using your own flours and methods. As for the rising problem, there could be so many reasons, the texture of flour (finer or coarser) the yeast quality, the altitude can also affect the baking process (you can research that). Did you use psyllium husk and flax seeds as well? A slight alteration of the recipe might also give you different results.

Christine

Wednesday 31st of August 2022

I used physsliym powder not husk and it came out unspreadable