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Gluten Free Pastry Flour Mix (Dairy Free, Less Starch)

A gluten free pastry flour intended for tender, delicate baked goods. It has the ability to create a fluffier and a more delicate texture. This gluten free pastry flour mix is great for cakes, pie crusts, cupcakes, crepes, delicate cookies, muffins, and other non-yeast recipes. No no dairy powders, no tapioca, no potato starch or xanthan gum here.

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Even though there is a large variety of gluten free flour mixes available in stores I still prefer mixing my own gluten free pastry flour recipe. It’s cheaper plus I’m avoiding those cheaper starch flours and gums. And I can control exactly the ratio and and the quality of ingredients (I always opt for organic).

Gluten Free Pastry Flour Mix With Less Starch

Even though a gluten free pastry flour mix requires a more airy texture my preference is too use more whole grains than starches. Approximately 60% whole grain gluten free flours and 40% starch flours like cassava flour and arrowroot. The ratio works pretty well for cakes, pie crusts, cupcakes, crepes or delicate cookies.

I do not use potato starch, corn starch or tapioca because they are nutrition-less and usually come from genetically modified sources.

In my recent published cookbook I included this pastry flour mix plus 2 whole grain versions of gluten free flour blends and another grain free flour blend which I’m using throughout the book for most of my recipes. Make sure to check it out it you would like healthier gluten free baking and cooking options.

Gluten Free Pastry Flour Blend Recipe

Gluten Free Pastry Flour Ingredients

Sorghum Flour

Sorghum is an ancient 100 percent whole grain kernel that is ground into a fine flour. Sorghum flour is usually beige or white in color and is considered to be “sweet,” softly textured (smoother than rice flour) and mild-tasting.

The growing gluten sensitivities and the gluten free diet trend in recent years made sorghum flour very popular. People also like it because it’s low on the glycemic index, plus high in starch, fiber and protein. It also tends to be easier to digest and tolerate.

For healthier baked goods look for 100 percent sorghum flour that hasn’t been bleached, enriched or refined.

Brown Rice Flour

If you are looking to add nutritional content to your baked goods and trying to loose weight, then opt for brown rice flour, if you care only about the aspect of the baked goods then white rice flour is better.

Brown rice has a mild flavour and texture, the tan color also gives baked goods a slightly browner look.

Rice flour doesn’t absorb liquid and fat very well. That’s why a combination with other starches and flours will yield the best results.

There are many brands of rice flours out there, that can vary greatly in how fine they are plus their quality is different. As we know the chemical fertilizers and pesticides load on conventionally grown rice is enormous, so always opt for organic.

Also did you know that soaking reduces the arsenic levels in the rice? That’s why using sprouted rice flours is even better! I usually use a brown rice flour that is both organic in sprouted like this one (which is also available on Vitacost ) or this one from Amazon.

Cassava Flour

Cassava flour is not the same as tapioca flour. Tapioca is the bleached and extracted starch isolated from the rest of the cassava root, while cassava flour is made from the entire root.

DIY Gluten Free Flou0r Blend / Mix Recipe  #glutenfreeflourmix #glutenfreeflourblend #glutenfreeflour #glutenfree

Cassava flour is very mild and neutral in flavor, it’s gluten free, grain free and offers all the taste and texture of wheat, it is sub as a 1:1 wheat flour replacement in many recipes. But because it’s lighter and absorbs more liquid it’s best to use it in combination with other gluten free flours.

And as with any root vegetables, it absorbs nutrients and pollutants within its vicinity, therefore it is important to choose organic cassava flour.

Arrowroot Flour

Arrowroot flour is also called powder or starch, it’s a very fine white powder similar to cornstarch, it’s flavorless and is mostly used to lighten up the texture and structure in baking.

Arrowroot powder is a healthier alternative to cornstarch (which is often a genetically modified product and even when it’s organic it’s estimated that 25 percent of organic corn is GMO contaminated! (1). Plus the arrowroot flour is harvested from the tubers of its plant without the use of harsh chemicals or high heat.

Finding arrowroot powder is kind of difficult to find in stores but you will definitely find it online, the best product I found is this one from Namaste Foods.

Gluten Free Flour Blend Variations and Tips

  1. Use as a 1 : 1 replacement for flour or all-purpose gluten free flour blends.
  2. Gluten free flour does not rise like regular flour so you will need to add leavening agents like baking soda + an acid or baking powder. I don’t recommend adding those to your main flour. Instead, add them when the recipe requires.
  3. For extra binding properties you can add 1-2 tbsp of flax meal or psyllium husk, especially when you don’t use eggs.
  4. For longer storage, store in the refrigerator to prevent rancidity. You can store a portion of it in an airtight container at room temperature and refrigerate the rest for later use.
DIY Gluten Free Pastry Flour Blend / Mix

Gluten Free Pastry Flour Mix (Dairy Free, Less Starch & More Whole Grains)

A gluten free pastry flour intended for tender, delicate baked goods. It has the ability to create a fluffier and a more delicate texture. This gluten free pastry flour mix is great for cakes, pie crusts, cupcakes, crepes, delicate cookies, muffins, and other non-yeast recipes. No dairy powders, no tapioca, no potato starch or xanthan gum here.
Prep Time5 mins
Course: miscellaneous
Cuisine: Dairy Free, Gluten Free, Nut Free
Servings: 3 ⅓ cups
Calories: 530.8kcal
Author: HealthyTasteOfLife
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Ingredients
 

Instructions
 

  • Add the flours to a large mixing bowl.
  • Mix until fully combined.
  • Store flour mix in an airtight container in a dark cold place.

Notes

1. Store flour mix in an airtight container up to 1-2 weeks.
2. For longer storage, store in the refrigerator to prevent rancidity. You can store a portion of it in an airtight container at room temperature and refrigerate the rest for later use.
3. Use as a 1:1 replacement for flour or all-purpose gluten free flour blends.
4. Gluten free flour does not rise like regular flour so you will need to add leavening agents like baking soda + an acid or baking powder. I don’t recommend adding those to your main flour. Instead, add them when the recipe requires.
5. For extra binding properties you can add 1-2 tbsp of flax meal or psyllium husk, especially when you don’t use eggs.
Tried this recipe?Mention @HealthyTasteOfLife or tag #healthytasteoflife!

Nutrition

Serving: 1cup and 2 tbsp | Calories: 530.8kcal | Carbohydrates: 117.4g | Protein: 9.8g | Fat: 2.7g | Fiber: 8.8g | Sugar: 0.3g | Calcium: 1.7mg | Iron: 16.4mg

The information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator.

Recipe Rating




Antonia

Tuesday 28th of September 2021

Can this pastry flour mix be used for crossiants/puff pastry goods? :)

HealthyTasteOfLife

Tuesday 28th of September 2021

I don't this will work, bakeries usually use xanthan gum or other additives in order to make an elastic dough.

Brokk

Sunday 17th of January 2021

I tried following a pastry recipe using this pastry flour mix. It completely fell apart. Not just when baking, but actually just trying to roll it out flat, add a simple filling then roll it up (like a jelly roll). It was way thicker a layer than I wanted but even trying to lift up the edge it just dissolved in pieces. Step 5 says "for extra binding", but it felt like there wasn't any binding to start with.

HealthyTasteOfLife

Tuesday 19th of January 2021

I have no idea what kind of recipe you followed, but I can tell you this: pastry generally falls into one of two categories – 1. a more flaky pastry, like shortcrust (it has a more crumbly texture and is used for pies, tarts and quiches) or 2. a more elastic pastry that requires rolling or stretching (like puff pastry). You cannot make stretchy pastries with this gluten free flour mix because it has very little starch and no xanthan gum. The intention here was to use less processed ingredients (a healthier version) because all store bought gluten free flour mixes are filled with these too. So this recipe will be more suitable for crusts or a very wet dough like choux pastry. I managed to make eclairs and profiteroles with this mix of flour successfully.

Gina Batali-Brooks

Sunday 28th of June 2020

Thank you for this. I’m going to try it. Can the flour mix be frozen to keep it for even longer?

HealthyTasteOfLife

Monday 29th of June 2020

In the summer when it gets hot, refrigeration or freezing is required if you won't be using the mix within a short period of time, like about a month or two at most. If it’s colder up to 3 months or so.

HealthyTasteOfLife

Monday 29th of June 2020

In the summer when it gets hot, refrigeration or freezing is required if you won't be using the mix within a short period of time, like about a month or two at most. If it’s colder up to 3 months or so.

Wendie Roberts

Saturday 9th of May 2020

Sounds wonderful! Is there any chance I can substitute something like millet flour or tigernut flour for the brown rice flour??

HealthyTasteOfLife

Sunday 10th of May 2020

Millet should work too, it has a fine texture and is light in color. But I didn't use because it has some kind of bitter aftertaste for me. Tigernut will make the mixture a bit gritty. I would probably use cassava as the best substitution, no overpowering taste and it has a fine texture.

didiier

Sunday 23rd of February 2020

thanks for this. sorghum seems to be on my no-no list. any other reccommendation? [ps-allergic to coconut]

HealthyTasteOfLife

Monday 24th of February 2020

Try oat flour if you can digest oats. I also like millet flour and buckwheat flour (the light colored version). You might need to add some milled flax to the mix or extra starch if you use any of these.